Friday, March 10, 2017

Chicago Booth Names Stanford GSB' Madhav Rajan as Next Dean

For the second time Chicago Booth has selected a Stanford GSB professor as its new dean. Madhav Rajan, who chairs the accounting department at Stanford GSB and served as senior associate dean for academic affairs from 2010 to 2016, will be Booth's next dean on July 1st. 

Sunil Kumar, served as Chicago Booth’s dean from 2011 until leaving to become provost of Johns Hopkins University in July 2016, was former senior associate dean at Stanford, where he spent 14 years.

As senior associate dean for academic affairs at Stanford GSB, Rajan led the school’s MBA program, including overseeing admissions, curriculum, the student experience and career management. While at the GSB, Rajan also launched new joint-degree programs with Stanford’s engineering school and led initiatives toward greater integration of the business school within the larger university.

Rajan holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Madras as well as two master’s degrees and a PhD from Carnegie Mellon University. His research has focused primarily on analyzing management accounting issues through an economics lens, especially as they relate to the choice of internal control and performance systems in firms. Cost Accounting: A Managerial Emphasis, which he co-authored, is the leading cost accounting textbook used around the world. He also served as editor of the Accounting Review from 2002 to 2008.

Rajan also served as a visiting professor at Chicago Booth in 2007-8. 

Chicago Booth's ranking and reputation has been steadily rising over the past decade,  threatening Wharton’s previously undisputed place alongside Stanford and Harvard Business School (HBS) as the best business schools in the world. The Economist has ranked Chicago Booth the number one business school for five years running, from 2012 to 2016. And in last year’s U.S. News & World Report ranking, Booth tied with Stanford for second, behind HBS and ahead of Wharton. 

Top-Tier Cross-Admitting Schools

The following schools tend to cross-admit from each other in peer groups. The following data shows each schools top six cross-admit schools in order of overlap

Elite Tier Schools and the top 6 schools they tend to cross-admit with
1. Chicago Booth: Wharton, MIT, Kellogg, Columbia, Harvard and Tuck
2. Columbia Business School: Wharton, MIT, Stern and Chicago, Yale, Stanford
3. Harvard Business School: Stanford, Wharton, MIT, Kellogg, tie: Chicago and Tuck
4. Kellogg School of Management:  Haas, Chicago, Harvard, Tuck, Ross, Wharton
5. MIT Sloan:  Wharton, Stanford, Columbia, Chicago, tie: Harvard and Haas
6. Stanford GSB: Harvard, MIT, Haas, Yale, Wharton, Columbia
7. Wharton School: MIT, Chicago, Harvard, Columbia, Stanford, Stern

Tier 1 Schools and the top 6 schools they tend to cross-admit with
1. Berkeley Haas: Kellogg, Anderson and Marshall, Stanford, Harvard, MIT
2. Dartmouth Tuck: Darden, Yale, Duke, tie: Cornell and Ross, Kellogg
3. NYU Stern: Yale, Columbia, Wharton, tie: Anderson and Haas, Chicago
4. Yale SOM: Stern, Stanford, Tuck, MIT, Haas, tie: Columbia and Duke
5. Cornell Johnson: Duke, tie: Kenan Flagler and Tepper, tie; Georgetown and Darden, Tuck
6. Duke Fuqua: Ross, Cornell, tie Darden and Kenan Flagler, Tuck, Yale
7. Michigan Ross: Duke, Darden, Tuck, Cornell, Georgetown, Tepper
8. UCLA Anderson: Marshall, Haas, Ross, Stern, Duke, Cornell
9. UVA Darden: Kenan Flagler, Tuck, Tepper, Duke, Ross, Cornell



Sunday, March 5, 2017

QS has Ranked the Top 10 Executive MBA Programs In North America, Europe, And The Asia-Pacific

QS rated Kellogg School of Management’s EMBA  the number one Executive MBA program in North America. The UK’s Oxford Saïd tops Europe’s EMBA rankings, while the National University of Singapore’s (NUS) EMBA program is ranked the best in Asia.

North America’s top 10 EMBA programs all come from the US. The Wharton EMBA costs $193,000 but students can expect a 46% increase on their salaries after graduation. Duke’s Fuqua School of Business’ EMBA costs $158,000 with an average salary uplift of 94%. MIT Sloan EMBA students are the most experienced in the North America top 10 with 17 years’ class average work experience. The Duke Fuqua EMBA class have an average of 15 years work experience between them.



QS also ranked the world’s top joint Executive MBA programs. (The QS rankings are based on a variety of factors including EMBA participants’ average years of work experience, pre and post-EMBA salaries and salary uplift after graduation, as well as class diversity, and the school’s reputation for thought leadership and research.)

Making up the top three are the top-ranked Kellogg-HKUST EMBA - delivered in both the US and Hong Kong - the UCLA Anderson and NUS EMBA, and the TRIUM Global Executive MBA program jointly issued by the London School of Economics (LSE), France’s HEC Paris, and NYU Stern.

Latin America’s number one EMBA program can be found at the Universidad Adolfo Ibanex, with students taking classes in both Chile and Peru. The program costs ‘just’ $32,000.

Europe’s Executive MBA programs offer diverse, experienced, international classes. Four business schools from the UK make up the top ten, two from Spain, one from Switzerland, France, and Italy.
ESCP Europe’s EMBA program makes use of the school’s multiple European locations, with students rotating across campuses in Paris, London, Berlin, Madrid, Warsaw, and Turin. Just missing out on the top 10 are Executive MBA programs from the UK’s Cranfield School of Management, Cass Business School, and Copenhagen Business School in Denmark. 



Out of Asia-Pacific’s top 10 EMBA programs, Shanghai Jiao Tong University students enjoy the biggest salary uplift (75%) after graduation, although they’re also among the least experienced.

At the top-ranked National University of Singapore (NUS), EMBA students can expect a 26% salary uplift, even with a class averaging 16 years of work experience between them. CUHK Business School’s EMBA students are the most experienced in the Asia-Pacific top 10 with an average of 17 years’ experience between them.

Even the most expensive EMBA program in Asia-Pacific’s top 10 – City University of Hong Kong at $77,000 – is around half the price of the cheapest top 10 EMBA program in North America.



For more information, please jump here. 


Saturday, February 25, 2017

A Day in the Life of an INSEAD MBA

Chenting Zou, an MBA Class of 17 student has written the following blog about a typical day in the INSEAD MBA program. 


As the end of P1 is nigh, I thought it’s about time I start recording my INSEAD experience. Overall, this first term has been chaotic, thrilling, perplexing, and a lot of fun. I suppose it was €14,700 well spent.

Inspired by a recent company presentation called, “Day in the life of [prestigious consulting firm] employee”, I had the urge to capture a snapshot of a recent (and typical) day in P1. Before I applied to INSEAD, I didn’t know much about what I would do on a day-to-day basis, so I hope this is useful for people who are thinking about coming here and those who have been admitted but aren’t yet quite sure what a daily MBA life entails.

[Please note that this is only my daily routine, which is certainly not representative of all INSEAD students.]

7:30am – Wake up and leave for campus within 20 mins. I chose to rent a studio that’s halfway between the train station and INSEAD, so it’s a zombie-like 30 minute walk every morning.

8:20am – Arrive on campus, rush to get a cup of free coffee at Freddy’s bar. Down one cup, and fill it up again for the lecture.

8:30am – First lecture of the day was Prices and Markets. After discussing microeconomic theory about pricing pharmaceutical drugs, the whole class plays a game theory exercise.

10:00am – Play a quick game of Foosball in Freddy’s. Get another coffee in the 15 minute break before the next lecture.

10:15am – Financial Markets Valuation class. My favourite 🙂

12:00pm – Skip the optional Uncertainty, Data, and Judgment tutorial for a presentation on Amazon job interviews.

1pm – Speedy lunch with section-mates. We chat about last night’s Robin Hood Valentine’s auction, and the various students and staff who were “sold” for charity.

2pm – Coffee chat with fellow 17D’s and a 17J about his pre-INSEAD consulting job.

3pm – Waste two hours walking to the bank in Fontainebleau centre and trying to explain for the third time that my bank card has still not arrived. Nothing :/

6pm – Work on a group assignment with my five group mates. We’re getting better at splitting the questions so this one took much less time than the previous assignments.

7.30pm – Enjoy the tapas, sangria and live music at Freddy’s as part of Iberian week.

10pm – Get home and catch up on emails.

Receive email reminder about the P2 Managerial Accounting exemption exam.  After spending the next hour reading through textbook chapter summaries, I come to the realisation that spending four hours trying to cram the content for an exam I had a low chance of passing wasn’t worth it. Decide to prepare on imminent summer internship job interview instead.

Receive email about the upcoming bidding process for campus exchange. Mild panic. Book appointment with career coach to figure out my employability in Asia.

12am – Skype a friend from London and we arrange a trip to Lisbon, along with other INSEAD-ers, between P1 and P2.

1am – Collapse in bed.


Chenting Zou, MBA’17D
Chenting was born in China but spent most of her life in the UK, with the exception of a two year stint in Singapore and Hong Kong. She has 4 years' experience in the healthcare sector and her latest job before INSEAD was at a mobile health app that delivers AI triage and online doctor consultations. In her spare time, she enjoys dabbling in salsa, painting and Louis Theroux documentaries.

For more information, please check out The INSEAD MBA Experience blog



Wednesday, February 22, 2017

Babson Offers New MS In Business Analytics



Program Name: Master Of Science In Business Analytics
School: Babson College’s F.W. Olin Graduate School Of Business
Length of Program: 18 to 24 months
Cost: $55,000

Babson’s F.W. Olin Graduate School of Business have launched a Master of Science in Business Analytics, building on the MBA concentration in analytics course started in 2012. Babson also founded an MS in Finance.

Last year, 30% of Olin students who have concentrations were concentrating in analytics. The Babson MSBAtakes a uniquely integrated approach to analytics that develops graduates into data translators who can be the bridge between the technical and business areas of an organization.

The tagline is: ‘Business analytics for an entrepreneurial world.'” There is a demand for 2-4 million “business translators” in the U.S. who are comfortable enough in  IT and statistics. 

The ideal applicants are those with three to 10 years into their career and who have a demonstrated educational or practical foundation in quantitative or technical fields. A GMAT or GRE score is required from all applicants. There is one essay. Applicants must also have an undergraduate degree from an accredited institution with a GPA of 3.0 or above. All applicants must be interviewed, as well.
The program has rolling admissions; the application process is now open.



The Olin MSBA consists of 18 required core credits and 12 elective credits, with semesters structured so students typically learn two to three subjects at a time. Core courses are Introduction to Analytics and the Principles of Entrepreneurial Thinking and Acting, Methods (Information Technology; Data Exploration and Analytics), and Applications (Marketing Analytics; Economic Analytics). Students can choose from a variety of analytic elective courses, including Digital Marketing, Supply Chain Management, and Private Data Security, among many others.

Building off its reputation as a top school in entrepreneurship, Olin requires all MSBA students to start with the entrepreneurial mindset  course.  Principles of Entrepreneurial Thinking and Acting. Then comes data management, data storage, data manipulation, and so on. Following that are courses in data visualization, data mining, marketing analytics, and economic analytics — forecasting and trendsetting.

The final course is a partnership with a local company on a project in which students, working in teams, tackle some specific problem, applying what they’ve learned to a real-life business situation. 

The first offering of the capstone project will be in May 2018 or January 2019.

For more information see Babson's MSBA website.


Monday, February 13, 2017

Average GMAT Scores At The Top 50 U.S. MBA Programs




P&Q Rank & School
2015 GMAT
2014 GMAT
2013 GMAT
2012 GMAT
2011 GMAT
5-Year Trend
  1. Harvard Business School
725
726
727
724
724
+1
  2. Stanford GSB
733
732
732
729
739
-6
  3. Chicago (Booth)
726
724
723
720
719
+7
  4. Penn (Wharton)
732
728
725
718
718
+14
  5. Northwestern (Kellogg)
724
713
713
708
712
+12
  6. Columbia
715
716
716
715
716
-1
  7. MIT (Sloan)
716
713
713
710
710
+6
  8. UC-Berkeley (Haas)
715
717
714
715
715
——-
  9. Dartmouth (Tuck)
717
716
718
717
718
-1
10. Yale SOM
721
719
714
717
719
+2
11. Duke (Fuqua)
696
690
694
690
689
+7
12. Virginia (Darden)
706
706
706
703
701
+5
13. Michigan (Ross)
708
702
704
703
703
+5
14. UCLA (Anderson)
713
715
706
704
704
+9
14. Cornell (Johnson)
697
692
691
694
691
+6
16. New York (Stern)
720
721
721
720
719
+1
17. UNC (Kenan-Flagler)
701
697
683
692
689
+12
18. Texas-Austin (McCombs)
694
690
690
692
692
+2
19. Carnegie Mellon (Tepper)
690
687
691
693
686
+4
20. Emory (Goizueta)
678
678
681
677
681
-3
21. Indiana (Kelley)
668
668
664
664
670
-2
22. Washington (Foster)
688
682
670
670
675
+8
23. Washington Univ. (Olin)
695
699
696
698
696
-1
24. Georgetown (McDonough)
692
691
688
683
686
+6
25. Notre Dame (Mendoza)
682
686
690
687
692
-10